Posts in category

Nanotechnology


The Age of Atomically Precise Manufacturing

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Student Spotlight: Sustainable porous carbon nanofiber alternatives to oil-based materials

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The potential for nanofiber

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Atomically flat membranes, one molecule thick based on modified amino acids and containing atomically precise pores. The development is by Professor Christian Schafmeister, Temple University Department of Chemistry and a recipient of the KidneyX Prize, and the Feynman Award for Experimental Nanotechnology. One important potential application is blood purification for portable dialysis devices. Photo courtesy of Professor Christian Schafmeister

Talking Nanotechnology with David Forrest David Forrest was one of – if not the very first – to draw attention to the potential for nanotechnology in textiles in a presentation …

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Figure 1. Porous carbon nanofibers derived from organosolv lignin and developed for glucose sensing.

The Bernal Institute hosts a multidisciplinary team of world-leading materials scientists and engineers at University of Limerick. The composite cluster aims to develop of new carbon fiber materials from sustainable …

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Scotland-based CelluComp has invented a proprietary process that is unique in allowing the properties of cellulose nanofibers (CNF) made from root vegetable waste to be fully utilized.

Nanofiber is a continuous fiber, which has a range of billionths of a meter. As a definition, nanofibers are generally classified as a fiber that is 1 nm to 100 …

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Polarized light microscopy of liquid crystal

The Soft Functional Materials Lab @ VCU is motivated to apply fundamental science to solving challenging and practical problems. The lab focuses on the processing and characterization of soft functional …

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By Haydn Kriel, R&D Manager; Dr. Megan Coates, Senior Scientist; and Dr. Eugene Smit, CEO, The Stellenbosch Nanofiber Company (Pty.) Ltd. (SNC)

Nanofibers have a range of applications in medicine, cosmetics, environmental monitoring, energy generation and the manufacture of smart materials. The high surface area-to-volume ratio of these nanomaterials is highly beneficial for drug delivery and catalysis, and their controllable pore sizes, that can be tailored to selectively exclude components like bacteria or pollutants, makes nanofiber webs ideal for filtration, tissue engineering and wound care. Nanofibers are also versatile in that additives can be encapsulated within the fibers or coated on to the surface. The choice of the polymer and the nanofiber dimensions can be changed to obtain specific material properties.

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